Portuguese Fall 2016

Taught in Portuguese

PORT 1110 – Beginning Intensive Portuguese with Lilian Feitosa

Prerequisite: Completion of FREN 2020 or SPAN 2020, or instructor permission.

  • Section 001 MWF 11:00-11:50AM in CAB 191
  • Section 002 MWF 12:00-12:50PM in CAB 191

Introduces speaking, understanding, reading and writing Portuguese, especially as used in Brazil. Five class hours and one laboratory hour. Followed by PORT 2120. 

PORT 3010 – Advanced Grammar, Conversation and Composition with Lilian Feitosa  

MWF 10:00-10:50AM in CAB 191

Prerequisite: PORT 2120 or by permission.

Studies advanced grammar through analysis of texts; includes extensive practice in composition and topical conversation. 

PORT 3559 – New Course in Portuguese "New Brazilian Television Fiction" with Eli Carter 

TuTh 3:30-4:45PM in New CAB 036   (Note: This course is cross-listed with Media Studies course MDST 3559  "New Brazilian Television Fiction")

The objective of this course is to examine the development of Brazilian television fiction from its origins in 1950 to modern-day broadcast, paid TV, and Internet programming. To this end, the course will focus on key policies and players—networks, screenwriters, directors, and independent production companies—formats, different modes of production, and financing mechanisms.

PORT 4410 – Brazilian Cultural Production I (1500 to 1900)  with Eli Carter 

TuTh 2:00-3:15PM  in New CAB 036

Prerequisite: The completion of PORT 3010 or equivalent

Portuguese nobleman Pedro Álvares Cabral and his fleet of 13 ships representing the then thriving Iberian Empire left Lisbon in March of 1500 for the East Indies.  History informs us that after passing the Cape Verde Islands, the fleet, likely unintentionally, headed west, away from the African coast.  Roughly a month later, on April 21, 1500, Cabral and his men came upon a northeastern piece of coastline that would eventually form part of the country known formally today as Brazil.  From the earliest moments of Portugal’s arrival to and subsequent, albeit somewhat uneven, colonization of the vast territory, references to Brazil’s edenic nature have permeated the country’s literary production.

The purpose of this course is to examine Brazilian Literature from 1900 to the present, providing the student with a broad understanding and historical contextualization of the most important literary works, figures, themes, genres, and periods. The first half of the course will largely focus on Modernismo, while the second half on more contemporary trends. Although we will emphasize our readings of the works themselves, we will use José Murilo de Carvalho’s exploration of the historical presence of the edenic and satanic motifs in the Brazilian social imaginary as a theoretical point of departure.

CANCELLED:  PORT 4420 – Brazilian Cultural Production II (1900 to Present)  with Eli Carter 

Prerequisite: The completion of PORT 3010 or equivalent

This course will not be offered during Fall 2016.

Portuguese nobleman Pedro Álvares Cabral and his fleet of 13 ships representing the then thriving Iberian Empire left Lisbon in March of 1500 for the East Indies.  History informs us that after passing the Cape Verde Islands, the fleet, likely unintentionally, headed west, away from the African coast.  Roughly a month later, on April 21, 1500, Cabral and his men came upon a northeastern piece of coastline that would eventually form part of the country known formally today as Brazil.  From the earliest moments of Portugal’s arrival to and subsequent, albeit somewhat uneven, colonization of the vast territory, references to Brazil’s edenic nature have permeated the country’s literary production.

Moving back and forth between Modernismo and more contemporary trends, the purpose of this course is to examine Brazilian Literature from 1900 to the present, providing the student with a broad understanding and historical contextualization of the most important literary works, figures, themes, genres, and periods.

Fall
2016
Undergraduate Courses